Tag Archives: collaboration

Promoting Collaboration At Yoocan

Podcast Episode 70 We can sometimes feel that we are alone in our journey but often by simply looking around we realise we are not. The focus of this week’s podcast, Yoocan proves this in the way they provide an online space to share stories and to inspire each other. In this interview, Moshe Gaon co-founder of Yoocan explains why Yoocan exists and what its primary aims and objectives are.

Moshe also talks about how important collaboration is in advancing the way we do things and helping speed up the pace of change for young people with additional needs. He explains why we need to look outside what we know into other areas to find solutions that have been created for other reasons but help us to solve our own problems.

Moshe also talks about why Yoocan is a social enterprise, not a charity and why this is important in the long term not only for the success of Yoocan as a platform for collaboration but also why social enterprises are a better way to bring about real sustainable change.

The hint in the name really but actually Yoocan is about more than what each of us can do it is about understanding that you can do more when you look at what others have done before you or are doing beside you.

Show Full Transcript
Podcast Transcript
DEBRA: Welcome to Episode 70 of the Journey Skills podcast. I hope you’ve already heard of the organisation which is the focus of this episode, if not, then like me you’ve been missing out on some great resources and generally, just the website that offers so much in terms of ideas and inspiration. If I had to use two words to describe what I’m talking about with Moshe Gaon, the founder of Yoocan, it’s about connection and collaboration.

Over the last two years of doing this podcast, I’ve noticed an awful lot of replication of amazing ideas. To me, this seems such a waste because we need to be learning off each other. And this is not a criticism in any way at all. A full of admiration for everyone I’ve spoken to who is basically stopped talking about an idea and just got out and done it. But I do think that we need to realise that often the beginning of a solution is already out there for us. And we need to be tapping more into each other’s knowledge and experiences. This is only going to help all of us move forward quicker and help us get our young people to where they need to be quicker as well.

It’s a kind of hope that this is where the Journey Skills podcast fills a bit of a gap; making more people aware of the various projects out there and the various people that doing amazing things. And purely from a personal point of view, I’m starting to feel myself that I am so much better equipped to go out and help my daughter achieve the level of independence that she actually wants.

Moshe and I talk about a variety of issues including why there isn’t’ as much collaboration as they should be. We also talk about connection which is incredibly important as we navigate some pretty rocky roads at times. We also discuss this social enterprise idea and why charities can’t solve some of the issues and why we need to be talking more about enterprise and how doing that and having an enterprise changes perceptions, not just for ourselves, but for our young people and actually in the wider community as well.

DEBRA: Today, I’m talking to Moshe Gaon who is from Yoocan. Welcome, Moshe!

MOSHE: Hi, it’s my pleasure.

DEBRA: Can you tell me a little bit about yourself first of all and then what Yoocan is all about?

MOSHE: Sure. I’m a businessman, an entrepreneur and an investor in early stage companies. I’ve been involved in many, many areas in my lifetime working in advertising and marketing, working with innovative startups here in Israel and investing in numerous areas in industry, financial businesses. And about five years ago, I decided that there is a need out there to start a startup that will help people with disabilities solve two major problems in their lives: one is the frustration of search, looking for different things. They may not find where they are and the second thing is the loneliness; the feeling that people have, that they are all alone and when there is a problem that they’re trying to solve, they cannot find the right people to speak to so they feel alone and it doesn’t make a difference where they’re from in the world, it doesn’t make a difference what they have and it really depends you know if they have a child or it themselves.

Those two things; their frustration of search and the frustration of loneliness are equal around the world. So when I’ve learned this from personal experience from my family which I’ll tell you in a minute about, I decided that there’s a need to start this company that will solve these two major problems. That’s how I started with Yoocan.

DEBRA: Can you explain exactly what Yoocan is? I mean you said before it’s obviously a resource centre but what exactly is the purpose of Yoocan?

MOSHE: Okay, so once I explain the need, the need was to try and give this problem a solution. The idea was to develop a collaborative community; a place where people can actually share their stories, learn from other’s experiences and to put together a community that would bring in solutions from around the world to help one another. It could be solving people’s needs for empowerment, to believe in themselves and to believe that they can do things that’s why we called it Yoocan.

And the second thing was to find the resources to help them achieve these dreams of theirs, their goals. So it could be somebody wants to travel around the world, it could be somebody who wants to play music, it could be somebody who wants to dive or to surf, or it could be somebody who wants to learn about fashion or anything that you would like to do. And it starts from early age, from very young children who wanna do things and their parents wanna help them but they don’t know how to do it. And it goes into older adults who have this dream to do things and they wanna learn from others.

So if you go in Yoocan, it’s really a collaborative resource centre that allows people to learn from other’s experiences, to learn from their empowering stories and an access to solutions from around the world, it could be products, services, activities. That’s what Yoocan is about, that’s why we call it You Can Do Anything.

DERBA: So it’s obviously a business startup, so how did it get started? What did you actually do to get things moving? Because you need to market it, you need to get people involved, how have you done that?

MOSHE: Well, my vision was that the problem with a lot of projects that are starting the disability community is that people feel that it’s Philanthropy. This is something that you need to raise money from philanthropists and it’s not something that you could stand on its own and there is no real business model for it. So, usually, as you go along, you waste most of your time trying to raise money rather than actually build a business or build the solution.

So the idea was that we need to learn from other startups from other industries and build something that has the potential to be a business, something that can stand on its own, something that can actually earn money. So we are in what we call the For-Profit Business; a business which is an impact business, it’s designed to do good and is designed to solve people’s problems and to give them solutions but it’s really also designed to be a business that stands on its own and earns money that we can sustain the business as we go along.

So we’re not profitable yet, I mean we’re still building the business but from the beginning it was designed to be something with a business model and our business model is very simple; we provide free solutions to the community but we hope that eventually suppliers, sellers and people themselves will use the platform to buy things or to sell things. And by doing that, we are able to get a commission from the sales and that commission goes into helping the business sustain itself. So that’s the logic of it. The logic is that but the logic is that it will eventually be a business that will provide people solutions on one hand and on the other hand, by the fact that people find those solutions on Yoocan, we will be able to sell things like a marketplace, and from that commission, from those earnings that we will get, we will be able to build a business, increase the potential of it, build more services into it and sustain the business, rather than raise money from philanthropists.

DEBRA: Can we explore that a little bit more because it’s an issue the whole idea that people expect things like this to be a charity as opposed to being a business and that you have to justify that it is a business and not a charity because people think that people with disabilities need a charity to support them as opposed to a business. Is that something you’ve found as well?

MOSHE: Yeah well there are two problems that have to do with for-profit businesses. One is that the investors that are used to investing in startups which are in other industries, you know like crypto or into marketplaces or into internet businesses, they are used to investing in those businesses and they don’t ask questions about what’s the potential, what’s the risk because they’re more used to it, they are more familiar with these businesses and it’s much easier for them to make a decision on investing.

But when it comes to disabilities, it becomes completely different stories because people are used to the idea that when you’re talking disabilities, this is about Philanthropy, this is about not making money, this is about government’s investing. So why should you invest in these companies? And my vision to the world is that people with disabilities are a very big community around the world. They are buyers and they are people with buying power just like any other communities around the world. And they buy a lot of things just like anybody else buys. When you have a family with a disability, you know that there are much more needs. You usually buy things that others don’t really buy, maybe different things. So your buying power maybe bigger for those areas that are relevant for people with disabilities.

So I think that when you actually explore farther into the disability community, you find that many products that are sold for people with disabilities have a very big potential of selling around the world and becoming very good businesses. So, as we look around the world today, because of the innovation, making in 3D, in internet of things, in driverless cars, people are starting to understand that these are industries that have a lot of potential for products for people with disabilities in video, in smart homes. So, if you look at wheelchairs that are becoming more sophisticated, if you look at hearing aids these are becoming more sophisticated, vision aids becoming much smarter and many other areas as well. I think that we will see much more development, much more innovation in these areas. And people will start getting used to the idea that this is a very, very big business.

So, Yoocan is really an innovator in a sense that we still need to convince people that this is a business and we have invested a lot of money into building Yoocan from private investors, myself included. We’ve put a lot of money into building it because we believe that this is something that we invest in something that has a credibility of becoming a business and not just being a business on its own but also being a promoter of other businesses and allowing other businesses, other innovations, other startups to present themselves on Yoocan.

So, if you go on Yoocan, you will see a lot of innovation, you will see a lot of companies, you will see a lot of startups, you will see a lot of technology that we are actually allowing others to present themselves for free. So I hope that eventually, we will be a place where everybody that is involved in disability will appear, will be taking part in and will collaborate with us.

DEBRA: You mentioned before about taking note of what other startups have done in other industries, do you think that’s a bit of an issue when  a lot of organisations seem to go from the very beginning rather than finding out from others so it seems that Yoocan would have a good thing with collaboration of businesses learning from each other even if they’re not doing exactly the same thing.

MOSHE: It’s a very good point because I think that there are a number of problems in what I would call the disability community but also in the Philanthropy area as well; that people are raising a lot of money for many, many things that are duplicated efforts. And if you look at what people are doing, there are so many people who are doing the right things and from the right place in the heart but these are duplication of efforts. They do the exactly the same things that others are doing maybe in their own neighbourhood or definitely in their own country.

So I think that there is a lot of room and a lot of potential for collaboration. We’re doing things together because I think that could also save money but also can save time and efforts because there are many, many things that you may think that you’re doing innovative but somebody else has done it already or somebody else is already has the database or the marketing effort or the knowledge for something that you think you’re starting from the scratch and you need to build up.

So I think that Yoocan is also about telling people that we don’t have to do everything from scratch, we can actually collaborate and the more we collaborate together, the more the efforts will be effective. You can save money, you can build businesses together, you can build marketing efforts together, you can provide services together.

I’ll give an example you know I find people that are working on developing a product because they may have a child with a spinal cord injury and they want to help them surf. But if you go on Yoocan, you will find maybe ten companies around the world already developing surfing boards and you can actually find many, many surfing boards for people with spinal cord injuries already on Amazon and many of them are actually available around the world. So why would you go investing money now in developing something from scratch if you can actually go on Yoocan and find the solution and just order it and get it in two weeks’ time? Instead of working out three months to develop it. That’s just one example.

It goes to music product, it goes into fashion products, it goes into medicine, it goes into wheelchairs. In many industries, I find that people are trying to develop something from scratch where this product exists somewhere else in the world. And when I go around the world talking to people and they come to me and say, “Moshe, do you know of a vision product that can help my child that has this problem?” and I say, “Sure, there’s this company in Israel. We’ve developed this product, why don’t you just you go on Yoocan and talk to these guys.”

So, I think that it’s amazing that it wasn’t done before and nobody has actually done it and it’s also amazing that Yoocan is trying to do it with very limited efforts because we only raised a million half dollars for Yoocan and it’s not too much and we’re not doing it every year in raising funding efforts and celebrations. We believe that we need to be very effective. But I think that we’ve actually achieved so far is pretty amazing compared to the limited time we’ve been around and the money that we’ve invested in it.

And I think that if we get more companies to collaborate with us and we get more partners to work with us and we get more organisations around the world to help us, I think we can actually build the world’s largest resource centre and collaborative community to benefit everybody and the good thing about it is that it’s provided for free to the people. So that people have to pay for it, they’re getting it for free. The only thing we need to do is to get people more awareness to know about us, to share their stories on Yoocan, to look for things on Yoocan and even maybe to buy through Yoocan so we can actually make some commission on it and build a business for them.

DEBRA: I just want to explore that a little bit more the whole idea that we end up doing things from scratch so do you think it’s because people just genuinely think there’s nothing out there so I’m going to  do it all myself?

MOSHE: It’s that as well, yes, I think that many people think that they’re smarter than others so they want to try it on their own. That’s definitely one of them. They think that they know better and they will do it differently. And people don’t understand that it really takes a long time to learn how to do things and it takes a lot of money to build things right so one of the frustrating things that I learned is that many people try and then that after a while they fail and then their efforts go into the garbage and it’s a waste. And I think that many people need to say to themselves, “Before I start something, maybe I should look around and see what’s out there and maybe we can do together rather than start from scratch.”

The second thing is that I think that people think that their needs are different than others and what people do in one place is not similar to what they want which in many cases is not the right thing. I mean, in many cases, they think they’re different but they’re not because what we find is that the problems that may be in one disability may not be solved by the same disability maybe but from another disability that you could find a solution for it.

For example, if somebody doesn’t have a leg because of a disease, I don’t know if its diabetes or an accident, the solution for its problem may come from another disease that created the solution for somebody that lost their leg because of that disease. If you understand what I’m saying. Because the problem was that the person has one leg, it’s nothing because he has diabetes. So what you need to do is to look for what is the problem that somebody is trying to solve; is he trying to ride a bike, he is trying to surf, is he trying to jump from an airplane. What is the problem he is trying to solve, what is he trying to do rather than what disease he has. And my brother’s son, Erez, who is the inspiration for Yoocan, was born 11 years ago with a very, very unique disease. He has multiple disabilities but is still is a very, very sweet kid, he’s smart, he knows how to do many, many things and he likes to do many, many different things but his disability which is multiple limits the way he can move around. So, if we needed to solve his problem, we may find that solution in a disease which is completely different than his because his disease gives him limitation in movement. So, he could actually have a solution riding a bike that comes from a disability which is completely different which is also about movement disability. If you understand what I’m trying to say.

So I think we need to be very, very creative in the way we approach this rather than say, “Oh my kid has this disability I must find him a solution.” Rather than say, “I’ll look around and see other kids who have a movement disability from different disciplines, from different disabilities and see what they’re actually doing and maybe I’ll find a solution which is better for my child.”

DEBRA: Do you think that that’s partly because we have labels and those labels are quite rigid so a person might have autism and that’s what they have?

MOSHE: Yeah, it comes from these structures of how Philanthropy was actually created is that you have a charity that’s about autistic children so the only focus on autistic children and if you have a charity about spinal cord injuries, that is about that. So each one of them is focused and very, very nervous about protecting its investors or its philanthropists and not sharing knowledge and not sharing services, and not sharing databases. And I think that we need to break that, we need to get everybody together to say, “Here’s what we’re doing, here’s what we’re doing great, here’s what we learned that doesn’t work and doesn’t work for us. Once we share that information with one another, I think we can actually build a bigger community. And it’s amazing because disability around the world is about 25% in every population, almost in every country and it’s a huge power community. I mean, there’s a lot of people, a lot of families, it’s every 5th family disability catches on. And still, if you look at its impact on governments, it’s leverage on companies. It’s very limited.

And I think that companies talk about doing things but compared to what they can do is very minimal; corporations are not investing enough money in this community, they’re not investing enough money and find solutions for this community and these are billion dollar companies. We’re doing very, very little compared to what they can do. So I think it’s all because everybody talks about it– collaborations but there’s very little collaboration and I think that what I see the vision for Yoocan is, to be at the head front of telling people what collaboration is about and if you go in to Yoocan, you will see how many companies and how many organizations are already collaborating on Yoocan. We have now more than 1000 organisations on Yoocan. We’re collaborating with many organisations from around the world, you know, UK to Australia to the US to Israel to Germany to every country around the world almost. We have 105 countries participating. We have storytellers, almost 2000 storytellers now on Yoocan from around the world– sharing their stories from every country in the world regardless if these countries talk to one another, the people talk to one another which is pretty amazing.

And I think is what the vision is about. So I think that if we start collaboration, if we break down barriers, if we share information and knowledge, if we allow people to share their stories with one another, if people create awareness for Yoocan, I think it can really change the way people are actually behaving and sharing knowledge and that will solve people’s problem around the world.

DEBRA: Thank you so much for your time.

MOSHE: Great, I appreciate it and share Yoocan story!

DEBRA: Key takeaway? Well I don’t need to reinvent the wheel to solve some of the issues that I’m looking at solving for my daughter. There are already people out there doing some amazing stuff and I need to go and talk to them and learn from them.

Resources
Yoocan website
Yoocan on Facebook

Please subscribe to this podcast and if you have a story you would like to share I would love to hear from you just email debra@journeyskills.com

Please Review Us On iTunes

If you liked this podcast and would like to help us, please do the 1, 2, 3:
(1) Click Review on iTunes (2) Click ‘View in Itunes’; and (3) Click on ‘Ratings and Reviews’ (just to the right of ‘Details’) and leave a review.

Collaborating For The Future


Podcast Episode 58  Any journey is made easier by walking with others. That is the focus of this episode – the impact of collaboration with, in this case, the theater as the space where the collaboration starts Continue reading